LATEST WHO GUIDELINE ON ARV AVAILABILITY DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC

 
 
 

WHO urges health care providers to maintain TB services during COVID-19 pandemic 

24 March 2020

In a new resource, released in advance of World Tuberculosis Day (24 March), the World Health Organization (WHO) has outlined the key considerations for tuberculosis (TB) care services in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Frontline healthcare workers wearing a protective mask and tb mask to prevent the spread of airborne disease

Tuberculosis is one of the world’s oldest diseases, and continues to be the leading infectious disease killer. A total of 1.5 million people died from TB in 2018, which included 251,000 people living with HIV. 

Both COVID-19 and TB primarily affect the lungs and the presented symptoms are also common: a cough, fever, weakness and difficulty breathing. The diseases are also spread in similar ways, although TB typically has a much longer incubation period and more gradual onset of symptoms.  

There is currently very limited information available about the impact of COVID-19 on people at risk of and living with tuberculosis. In a small-scale observational study from Shenyang, China, researchers reported an increased susceptibility of SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19 disease – and increased COVID-19 severity among patients with active or latent TB. However, this requires validation in a larger study. 

The WHO also acknowledges the increased risk of severe illness among people with both TB and COVID-19 – particularly if TB patients have their treatment interrupted. To ensure continuity of care for people affected by TB, it has issued an information note to assist healthcare providers in maintaining TB services during the pandemic.  

Among the WHO’s recommendations are measures to limit the transmission of TB and COVID-19. It highlights that similar protection measures for infection prevention and control can be applied to both diseases, in line with WHO Guidelines. Alongside this, preventative treatment for TB needs to be maintained as much as possible.  

To reduce opportunities for COVID-19 infection, the WHO strongly recommends prioritising patient-centred outpatient and community-based care over hospital care for TB patients. In line with this, TB medicines should be made available for patients to take home in order to reduce the number of visits to treatment centres.  

Appropriate planning and monitoring are crucial to maintain the supply of treatment and ensure diagnostics services continue to operate – with tests for both TB and COVID-19 offered to those with respiratory symptoms.  

In addition, the WHO also identifies opportunities where TB services can be leveraged in the response to the pandemic. This includes drawing on the expertise of health care workers for pulmonary complications of COVID-19, and efforts made in prevention and control, contact tracing, household and community-based care and surveillance and monitoring systems. 

Community guidelines for comments can be found in our website T&Cs

 

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Newsletter options
 
 

Feedback
 
 
 
 
 
Select an element on the page.
 
 
Home Global information and education on HIV and AIDS Enter your keywords Information on HIV About HIV & AIDS What are HIV & AIDS? How HIV infects the body Symptoms Cure for AIDS Glossary I'm worried about HIV Transmission & prevention How do you get HIV? Sex and HIV Injecting drugs Pregnancy, childbirth & breastfeeding Blood transfusions & transplants HIV myths Safer sex Testing Why get tested? When to get tested? What’s involved? What happens after? HIV testing personal stories Living with HIV Newly diagnosed Sharing your diagnosis Treatment Health & wellbeing Living with HIV personal stories Sex & STIs Puberty Exploring your sexuality Am I ready for sex? Sexual consent Relationships How to have sex Safer sex STIs First time sex stories Sex & STIs personal stories Learn & share Fact sheets Quizzes HIV: The Basics HIV timeline Personal Stories Talking HIV Videos and graphics World AIDS Day 2019 News Coronavirus About COVID-19 COVID-19 and HIV Hubs Gay health Young Voices Africa Professional resources About Avert Who we are Vision, mission and values Staff team Trustees Our history What we do Strategy Partners and projects Our impact Annual reports Our working principles Get involved Ways to give Share our work Newsletter signup Avert news Donate News Around the world Global statistics Global response Funding Global targets History History of HIV & AIDS overview HIV origins Timeline East and Southern Africa Regional overview Botswana Kenya Lesotho Malawi South Africa eSwatini Tanzania Uganda Zambia Zimbabwe West and Central Africa Regional overview Nigeria Asia & the Pacific Regional overview China India Myanmar Thailand Middle East & North Africa Latin America and the Caribbean Regional overview Brazil Eastern Europe & Central Asia Regional overview Russia Ukraine Western Europe, Central Europe & North America Regional overview UK USA Programming Prevention programming HIV prevention programmes overview Prevention of mother-to-child transmission Voluntary medical male circumcision Treatment as prevention Pre-exposure prophylaxis Harm reduction programming Treatment programming HIV treatment programmes overview Treatment cascade HIV drug resistance Emergencies and armed conflict HIV and co-infections HIV/Hep C co-infection programmes HIV/TB co-infection programmes Testing programmes Technology and e-health Social issues Key affected populations Men who have sex with men People who inject drugs Sex workers Prisoners Transgender people Women and girls Children Young people Disabilities Stigma & discrimination Homophobia Gender inequality Human rights Science The science of HIV & AIDS - overview HIV strains and types Developing a vaccine Searching for a cure Resources Fact sheets HIV timeline Videos and graphics Quizzes HIV testing resources Boost Home » News » WHO urges health care providers to maintain TB services during COVID-19 pandemic  WHO urges health care providers to maintain TB services during COVID-19 pandemic  24 March 2020 In a new resource, released in advance of World Tuberculosis Day (24 March), the World Health Organization (WHO) has outlined the key considerations for tuberculosis (TB) care services in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Frontline healthcare workers wearing a protective mask and tb mask to prevent the spread of airborne disease Tuberculosis is one of the world’s oldest diseases, and continues to be the leading infectious disease killer. A total of 1.5 million people died from TB in 2018, which included 251,000 people living with HIV. Both COVID-19 and TB primarily affect the lungs and the presented symptoms are also common: a cough, fever, weakness and difficulty breathing. The diseases are also spread in similar ways, although TB typically has a much longer incubation period and more gradual onset of symptoms.  There is currently very limited information available about the impact of COVID-19 on people at risk of and living with tuberculosis. In a small-scale observational study from Shenyang, China, researchers reported an increased susceptibility of SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19 disease – and increased COVID-19 severity among patients with active or latent TB. However, this requires validation in a larger study. The WHO also acknowledges the increased risk of severe illness among people with both TB and COVID-19 – particularly if TB patients have their treatment interrupted. To ensure continuity of care for people affected by TB, it has issued an information note to assist healthcare providers in maintaining TB services during the pandemic.  Among the WHO’s recommendations are measures to limit the transmission of TB and COVID-19. It highlights that similar protection measures for infection prevention and control can be applied to both diseases, in line with WHO Guidelines. Alongside this, preventative treatment for TB needs to be maintained as much as possible.  To reduce opportunities for COVID-19 infection, the WHO strongly recommends prioritising patient-centred outpatient and community-based care over hospital care for TB patients. In line with this, TB medicines should be made available for patients to take home in order to reduce the number of visits to treatment centres.  Appropriate planning and monitoring are crucial to maintain the supply of treatment and ensure diagnostics services continue to operate – with tests for both TB and COVID-19 offered to those with respiratory symptoms.  In addition, the WHO also identifies opportunities where TB services can be leveraged in the response to the pandemic. This includes drawing on the expertise of health care workers for pulmonary complications of COVID-19, and efforts made in prevention and control, contact tracing, household and community-based care and surveillance and monitoring systems.  References: World Health Organization (WHO) Information Note Tuberculosis and COVID-19; New diseases and old threats: lessons from tuberculosis for the COVID-19 response; COVID-19 and TB: Frequently Asked Questions; Active or latent tuberculosis increases susceptibility to COVID-19 and disease severity; Tuberculosis Community guidelines for comments can be found in our website T&Cs Share Search for news Latest news Group therapy improves mental health outcomes for people living with HIV in rural Uganda British HIV organisations clarify coronavirus advice for people living with HIV WHO urges health care providers to maintain TB services during COVID-19 pandemic  Ageing with HIV: prescribing errors ‘common’ Younger mothers struggle with HIV treatment adherence following birth of baby Subscribe to our mailing list * indicates required Email Address * First Name Last Name Newsletter options HIV news digest - updates on the latest HIV news Avert news - updates on Avert’s work, impact and fundraising Press releases Popular resources About Avert Our impact Support us Newsletters Young Voices Learn and share HIV timeline Contact us E: [email protected] Contact us Tell your story Information Standard Logo Help us Help us empower people through knowledge and achieve a world that is free of HIV. Every £1 you donate to Avert, helps us achieve that vision. Donate Follow us Jobs Media Terms and conditions Creative Commons Privacy policy Sitemap Safeguarding policy All material on www.avert.org is copyright Avert (unless stated otherwise). All rights reserved. Registered UK charity number: 1074849. Registered UK company number: 3716796. Feedback Select an element on the page. Home Global information and education on HIV and AIDS Enter your keywords
 
Categories
Read More
Eagle Hemp CBD Gummies Reviews, Ingredients, Price, Does it Works To sleep and Pain Relief?
Eagle Hemp CBD Gummies That's the time to rise up and be counted. It was a piss-poor excuse. I...
By Mayeol Soncv 2021-10-28 11:32:09 0 29
Style To Improve Organization Atmosphere By means of Adding up Bureau Fitouts
After you use up hr your stand daily, flat the smallest job of ones workspace-consisting with the...
By Michael Jordan 2021-08-20 11:58:39 0 70
Extreme Keto EFX UK Review- Shocking Dragen Den Price or Scam
They all aim to help the body in one of five ways; for energy, appetite control, fat & blood...
By Extreme Keto EFX 2021-10-26 10:22:33 0 26
Bangalore Escorts Divya Goal Offers The Best Companions For You.
Bangalore is a major commercial destination and you could have always landed up here on some...
By Divya Goal 2021-07-27 06:53:33 0 101
[email protected]://www.facebook.com/Puritan-CBD-Gummies-192503766179593
what is Puritan CBD Gummies?   Puritan CBD Gummies :- Puritan CBD Gummies is a secured and...
By EthaCrona EthaCrona 2021-08-27 07:06:59 0 55