Bully Beds is a family-owned, small business based in Florida that crafts dog beds made from the same memory foam used in high-end mattresses made for people. Each Bully Bed comes complete with a waterproof liner and our industry-leading 20-Year Warranty.
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  • Keeping your dog comfortable if they're suffering from hip dysplasia can be a challenge. In this article, we'll go over how to choose the best dog bed for hip dysplasia. Selecting the right bed can greatly improve your pup's quality of life.
    #dogcare #hipdysplasia #doghipdysplasia #dogbeds #bestdogbed
    https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/finding-the-best-dog-bed-for-hip-dysplasia-a-guide
    Keeping your dog comfortable if they're suffering from hip dysplasia can be a challenge. In this article, we'll go over how to choose the best dog bed for hip dysplasia. Selecting the right bed can greatly improve your pup's quality of life. #dogcare #hipdysplasia #doghipdysplasia #dogbeds #bestdogbed https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/finding-the-best-dog-bed-for-hip-dysplasia-a-guide
    Finding the Best Dog Bed for Hip Dysplasia: A Guide
    If you have a dog with hip dysplasia, you know firsthand just how painful this condition can be. And nothing breaks a pet owner's heart more than seeing their companion in pain.  Keeping your dog comfortable if they're suffering from hip dysplasia can be a challenge. But one of the best things that you can do for them is investing in an orthopedic dog bed.  In this article, we'll go over how to choose the best dog bed for hip dysplasia. Selecting the right bed can greatly improve your pup's quality of life.  We'll also go over the details of canine hip dysplasia so you can fully understand this condition. You'll also learn how to catch it early if it happens to occur in your dog, so keep reading for information every dog owner needs to know.  What Is Canine Hip Dysplasia? Canine hip dysplasia is a common skeletal disorder in dogs. It is characterized by a malformation of the ball and socket of the hip joint.  If the ball and socket do not develop properly, they rub and grind against each other instead of sliding smoothly. The joint does not function properly and thus deteriorates over time, leading to pain and arthritis.  There are both genetic and environmental factors that play a role in the development and progression of canine hip dysplasia. Big dogs are more genetically susceptible to hip laxity, which is a loose fit of the hip joint. Some of the large breeds that are most commonly affected include German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Great Danes, Saint Bernards, and Labrador Retrievers. Rapid weight gain, obesity, and improper nutrition can also cause hip dysplasia.   Symptoms of hip dysplasia depend on the degree of joint looseness and inflammation. The duration of the disease also plays a significant part in what signs you may notice.  Dogs with hip dysplasia may have difficulty rising or may seem reluctant to run, jump, climb stairs, etc. This is due to hip pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion.  You might also observe your dog limping or "bunny hopping" when running. Other signs include abnormal sitting positions, trouble standing for long periods of time, and cracking or popping sounds from joints.  Hip Dysplasia in Dogs: The Ultimate Guide (2021) Fortunately, there are a wide variety of options to help manage the symptoms of canine hip dysplasia. Physical therapy such as swimming or motion exercises are recommended to decrease joint stiffness and strengthen muscles. Weight loss and diet management also help take the stress off your dog's joints.  One of the best things that you can do to help your dog manage their symptoms is to get them an orthopedic dog bed.  How Orthopedic Dog Beds Help With Hip Dysplasia  Investing in an orthopedic dog bed is a great way to help your dog manage symptoms of hip dysplasia.  This disease doesn't affect the hip joint alone. Your dog overcompensates for the pain and lack of function. That means that hip dysplasia takes a toll on your dog's entire body. Their other joints begin to ache and their muscles get fatigued.  Orthopedic dog beds relieve the pressure point on your dog's joints. Good ones are made of memory foam that is specifically designed to take pressure off the joints.  Memory foam dog beds help dogs the same way it helps humans. It becomes soft enough to mold around a person or dog's body shape. This provides specialized support to the areas that need it most. Canine hip dysplasia often leads to a decrease in your dog's activity levels. That means they're going to spend a lot more time resting in bed.  This is why it's so important to select a bed with high-quality memory foam when you are choosing a dog bed. Low-quality memory foam loses its shape over time and does not hold up under constant use. They can also exacerbate hip dysplasia pain by providing inadequate support.  An orthopedic dog bed is an investment that should provide your dog comfort for a lifetime. This is why it's so important to take the time to choose the right bed for your dog. And Bully Beds helps make the decision easy for you -- we provide the highest quality beds that help your dog live a more comfortable life. How to Choose the Best Dog Bed for Hip Dysplasia  When it comes to orthopedic dog beds, the options can be overwhelming. But if you know what to look for and how to choose, the process becomes much simpler. Let's break down how to choose a dog bed that will help relieve symptoms associated with hip dysplasia.  Size Matters  Although large and giant dog breeds are the most vulnerable to hip dysplasia, the disease can occur in any dog. Senior dogs that are small and medium in size can also experience the same joint pain and reduction of function.  This is why the first thing you need to take into account is the size of your pup. Orthopedic beds are designed to help a specific dog size.  A golden retriever won't fit on a bed made for small dogs. But at the same time, a dachshund won't get the support it needs on a bed made for giant breeds.  If you have a small breed, buy a dog bed for small dogs. If you have a large breed, buy a dog bed for large dogs.  If you are unsure about sizing, measure your dog when they are lying down or sleeping. Measure both from nose to tail, and from paw to shoulder. These dimensions will be your guide when selecting an orthopedic bed.  How Does Your Dog Like to Sleep?  Every dog has a particular sleeping position that they are most comfortable in. Next time that your dog is sleeping, take note of what position they're in.  If your dog likes to sleep with their legs stretched out, make sure you select a bed that has enough space on all sides. For these types of sleepers, choosing a slightly larger bed is always a good option. This ensures that your pup has enough room to move around and get comfortable.  If your dog likes to curl up, choose a rounded bed with raised sides. This gives them something to snuggle up against that helps them feel safe and secure.  Some breeds, especially ones that were bred to dig and burrow, might prefer sleeping underneath a blanket. If this is the case, observe the general positioning of their body under the blanket and select a bed that caters to it.  Then, make sure to leave their favorite blanket on top of the new bed. This will encourage them to snuggle up on the memory foam.  This is a good idea for getting any dog used to a new bet. If they slept with anything in their old bed, transfer it to the new one. You can also use a favorite toy or treats to persuade them to check it out.  Your Dog's Range of Motion  As we covered above, hip dysplasia impacts your dog's range of motion. This makes it hard for them to rise from sitting or lying positions. It also makes it challenging to get up and down from elevated surfaces.  Take this into consideration when choosing a bed. The last thing you want is to cause your dog extra pain when they are getting in and out of bed. But an extremely flat dog bed is also no better than sleeping on the floor.  The best thing to do is watch how your dog gets up and down from slightly elevated surfaces. Try to determine the maximum height that they are comfortable moving up and down from. Then, compare that height to the height of the dog bed.  If they need extra help, use a doggie step to help them transition from the floor to the bed. The biggest thing to do is keep your dog's overall comfort in mind.  Waterproof Beds  Waterproof beds are excellent for senior dogs. As your dog ages, its bladder can weaken and thus fail more often.  If this is an issue that your dog faces, it's a great idea to get them a waterproof bed. This protects overnight accidents from soaking into the memory foam.  You have a few options when it comes to cleaning these beds. For small accidents, you can just wipe down the surface and leave it to dry.  You can also take the waterproof cover off the bed and washed in a washing machine. This tackles smells, stains, and extends the bed's lifespan. The Infrared Dog Bed  If you want to get your pup the best of the best, there is no better bed for treating hip dysplasia in dogs than Bully Beds' Infrared Dog Bed. This is one of the best dog beds for large dogs on the market today. It is the first and only dog bed that has an FDA medical device certification.  Bully Beds' Infrared Dog Bed uses your dog's body as its power source to provide warmth and comfort. Your dog's body naturally emits far-infrared rays. These FIR emissions are reflected by the bedding's ceramic-coated fibers.  The reflection of these rays dilates blood vessels and increases blood circulation. It also enhances tissue oxygen levels. Both of these effects provide pain relief to dogs struggling with hip dysplasia.  The FIR emissions are absorbed deep into your dog's tissue. This provides reduction of discomfort, increased recovery time, and even increased energy.  The fabric of the bed reflects the FIR emissions and allows excess heat to escape. This moderates sleep temperature and keep the bed from being too hot.  You can compare the benefits of this bed to the benefits of sleeping with a heating pad or heated blanket. The extra warmth and heat reflection create a calming effect as it encourages blood flow and raises tissue oxygen levels. This is why heating pads can help soothe muscle and joint pain in humans.  The Infrared Dog Bed works the exact same way for your dog. If your large dog is suffering pain from hip dysplasia, there is no better bed on the market for them.  The Original Bully Bed  The original Bully Bed is designed specifically for hip dysplasia support. The CertiPUR-US certified memory foam base provides joint and hip support to reduce discomfort caused by hip dysplasia.  The seven-inch raised section acts like a pillow and provides further spine support. The microfiber cover is easily removable and machine-washer safe. It's the perfect bed for great danes, mastiffs, and other large dog breeds. Orthopedic 3 Sided Bolster Bed If your dog likes to snuggle or lean against the sides of their bed, our 3 Sided Bolster Bed is the perfect option. It's designed just like the original Bully Bed, with the added feature of memory foam bolsters on three sides.   The bed is made with non-toxic and hypoallergenic materials. The memory foam is free from PBDEs, mercury, lead, heavy metals, formaldehyde, phthalates, and CFCs. It's the perfect bed for large breeds that need extra hip and joint support.  Calming Faux Fur Round Bed This round bed is designed with the softest faux fur on the market today. It stays cool, even during warm summer months. Your pup will love the smooth feel of the fur and the supportive foam.  The bed is designed in a deep doughnut style with bolsters ringing the entire outside. This provides a secure place for your dog to relax and feel safe.  The Calming Faux Fur Bed is our softest bed yet. The memory foam provides support for hips and joints while maintaining perfect softness. It's the perfect choice for dogs that prefer a softer bed or have trouble with canine anxiety.  Reducing Pain with Orthopedic Dog Beds Hip dysplasia is a serious and painful disease. But symptoms can be treated with proper veterinary care and the use of an orthopedic dog bed.  Bully Beds provides a plethora of options to help treat your dog's hip dysplasia, including the Infrared Dog Bed and the Original Bully Bed - two of the best dog bed for hip dysplasia on the market today.  If your dog is suffering from hip dysplasia, check out our full line of orthopedic dog beds. We have options to cater to every type of dog and sleeping style. Help reduce your pup's pain today.  
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  • Most large breed dog owners have heard of hip dysplasia, but don't know anything specific. If not treated properly, this scary condition can have negative effects on your pet's happiness and longevity. Read this post to get complete information about Hip Dysplasia in dogs.
    #dogcare #hipdysplasia #doghipdysplasia #petcare
    https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/hip-dysplasia-in-dogs
    Most large breed dog owners have heard of hip dysplasia, but don't know anything specific. If not treated properly, this scary condition can have negative effects on your pet's happiness and longevity. Read this post to get complete information about Hip Dysplasia in dogs. #dogcare #hipdysplasia #doghipdysplasia #petcare https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/hip-dysplasia-in-dogs
    Hip Dysplasia in Dogs: A Comprehensive Guide
    No one wants to see their dog in pain. You feel helpless and don't know what to do. This is especially true when it comes to hip dysplasia in dogs.  Most large breed dog owners have heard of hip dysplasia, but don't know anything specific. If not treated properly, this scary condition can have negative effects on your pet's happiness and longevity. It's true that large dogs are much more likely to develop this disease than small dogs, but it's still possible for them to be affected. All dog owners should know the signs, symptoms, and treatment options for hip dysplasia.  What is Hip Dysplasia? Canine hip dysplasia (CHD), is a common skeletal disease often found in large dog breeds. It's also found in smaller breeds, and even puppies as young as three months can receive a diagnosis.  When working properly, the hip joint functions as a ball and socket. If you're unfamiliar with what this means, it's just a way of saying that a rounded part of one bone moves in the concave surface of the connecting bone. This type of joint allows the most freedom and mobility of any other joint connection. Hip dysplasia occurs when there's a problem with the hip joint connection. In some cases, some dogs' ball and socket hip joints don't fit together right and the bones grind against each other incorrectly. It can be very painful for your dog. Over time, this causes the bones to deteriorate, and eventually, the affected hip joint won't be able to function at all. Genetics and Hip Dysplasia Genetics plays a large role in hip dysplasia. It's common to be passed down from one generation to the next. A dog with hip dysplasia has about a 25 percent chance of passing it down to their puppies. Even though it's a genetic disease, environmental factors can cause it to worsen. A rapid growth rate, damaging exercise, and your dog's diet can cause this genetic condition to worsen.  Most Affected Dog Breeds All dogs are at risk, but canine hip dysplasia shows up more often in certain breeds. Because it's a genetic condition, it gets passed down from adult dogs to their offspring. Larger and giant breed dogs are more likely to develop the condition than smaller dogs. This is because of their different growth rates. When buying from a breeder, you can ask what screening tests they've performed. There are tests available that can predict whether or not a dog will develop hip dysplasia. Since some large dog breeds are at a higher risk than others, having a breeder run some tests will help you know what to expect. They should also show you the dog's family history.  These are a few of the most affected dog breeds. Great Danes Saint Bernards Boxers Golden Retrievers Australian Shepards Mastiffs German Shepards Labradors Rottweilers Pitbulls The Best Dog Beds for Hip Dysplasia (2021) Types of Hip Dysplasia Most times this developmental disease doesn't show signs until a dog is well into adulthood. That doesn't mean it can't affect puppies.  Many experts believe that there are two different types of hip dysplasia. They divided them into two separate categories because the symptoms can be very different. Knowing what to look for at what times in your dog's life can make a huge difference. Juvenile hip dysplasia occurs in dogs younger than 19 months. A puppy with a genetic predisposition for hip dysplasia has functioning hip joints when born. Their hips start to change a few weeks after birth and a visible limp or discomfort may appear after a few months.  Mature hip dysplasia is present in affected adult dogs. It's possible they went undiagnosed when they were a puppy and now their disease has worsened. They could have developed the condition from situational factors. Causes of Hip Dysplasia There are a few causes of hip dysplasia in dogs. One is genetics. Most cases of hip dysplasia were passed down from the parents. Size also has an impact on the ball and socket hip joints, making this disease much more common in larger breeds. Nutrition and weight play a role as well. Obesity puts unneeded stress on your dog's joints and too little or too much exercise can hurt them.  Different breeds need varying levels of exercise. A rapid growth rate can negatively impact your dog's hips. Puppies grow fast and need to eat a lot, but feeding them too much can hurt their development. The bones and soft tissue structure should grow in tandem. This creates a stable joint. When the bones grow faster than the soft tissue, it results in a wobbly connection that over time can become osteoporosis. What is Osteoporosis? Microscopes reveal that healthy bones have a honeycomb appearance. This is because of small holes throughout the structure. In bones with osteoporosis, these holes grow larger. When the holes become too big this can lead to a multitude of health problems. Weaker bones are easier to break, hurt more, and drastically limit mobility. Dogs suffering from hip dysplasia have a high risk of developing osteoporosis.  Prevention It is impossible to prevent every dog from developing hip dysplasia. But, if you see the symptoms of hip dysplasia in your dog soon enough, there are a few actions you can take. These precautions will ease their pain and hopefully, prevent the disease from spreading. Supplementing their Diet There are many joint supplement options out there that work by soothing stiff joints. An anti-inflammation supplement is standard. Some supplements keep joint fluid healthy which makes movement easier. Others help cartilage stay strong and smooth. Glucosamine is a common supplement for dogs with arthritis. They are safe to use over a long period of time and tend to work well as a joint supplement. Researchers aren't sure how well glucosamine works as a preventative, but it can relieve some of your dog's pain and strengthen their bones. Smaller breed dogs are at a much lower risk. It may not be worthwhile to use this supplement unless you have a diagnosis. If your dog is a large breed and has a family history, glucosamine could help them. In addition to glucosamine, supplements generally have these ingredients. Omega3 Vitamin C Vitamin E Chondroitin Turmeric Hyaluronic acid (present in joint fluid) Don't be too concerned with side effects. Studies have shown that most supplements are safe for dogs to take over a long period of time. You can consult with your vet if you have additional concerns. Diet and Exercise Dogs with a healthy physique are less likely to develop joint problems. Every breed has different weight and exercise needs so consult your vet to find the best health plan. Most owners don't worry about an overweight puppy because they're growing. Keeping young dogs at optimal weight will help their bones grow in tandem with the surrounding tissue. Over-exercising can also be detrimental to the joints of a growing puppy. Making sure your dog receives adequate food and activity is important, but be cautious about overdoing it. X-rays and Screening Options For breeders, it's worthwhile to set aside money for routine screenings of their larger breeds. This helps them make an informed decision about which dogs to select for breeding. Wait to Neuter Your Puppy Research shows that delaying neutering your dog for the first year can be beneficial. After neutering, a lot of dogs go through a rapid growth spurt. Putting of this procedure is mainly recommended for breeds that are at high risk. Diagnosing Hip Dysplasia in Dogs You should be bringing your dog to the vet for regular check-ups. Part of a routine vet visit will be looking for some of the signs of hip dysplasia. Don't worry If you've recently adopted your dog and don't know their medical history. The shelter or breeder will give any health information they have to you.  Any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia are most likely noted. Your vet will conduct a physical examination. If they find anything irregular, they will ask you about the common signs of hip dysplasia in dogs. Signs of Juvenile Hip Dysplasia These symptoms may be harder to spot in dogs as opposed to puppies. With puppies, the pain is sudden and easier for them to notice. An adult dog has had the condition develop over time and might be more subtle with coping. Bunny hopping Joint looseness Strange positions when sitting Difficulty with stairs Reluctance to exercise Limping Chronic lameness Slow to stand up Stiffness Lethargic Muscle loss in hind legs Signs of Mature Hip Dysplasia Seeing a few of these signs once or twice is no cause for concern. If your dog displays symptoms most of the time, that's a sign that they need to go to the vet. Unusual levels of inactivity Limping General problems with hind legs Sleeping more often Joint looseness Swaying when walking What to Expect at the Vet Bringing your dog to the vet can be stressful for even a routine checkup. Knowing what to expect should help to settle some of your nerves. The vet will begin with a routine physical test. Starting with a joint laxity examination, the vet will manipulate the back legs to search for signs of pain, lack of mobility, detached joints, or any unusual looseness in the hip joints. Depending on the physical examination your vet may want to run a few lab tests. This consists of a urinalysis, a blood test to check for inflammation, and an electrolyte panel. Be prepared to answer any questions they may have about your pet's history. If hip dysplasia runs in their bloodline, bring the necessary paperwork to show your vet. X-ray Testing Any dog that shows symptoms or has a history of hip dysplasia in their family will need an X-ray.  A normal X-ray should provide most of the information your vet needs to diagnose your dog. Any abnormal joints will be visible. For more specific information, many breeding organizations use advanced X-rays. They use these X-rays to help them decide which dogs to breed in the future. They also improve experts' ability to predict which dogs will develop hip dysplasia later in life. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) is a very common test done in the United States. Your dog must be at least two years old and they won't receive sedation. No special certification is required for a vet to run this test. While the OFA screening can tell you a lot about the likelihood of a dog developing hip dysplasia, it is not as accurate as the PennHIP test. The PennHIP screening was also created to test for hip abnormalities. It predicts the chances of hip dysplasia occurring or passing down to the offspring. Both tests look for any signs of joint weakness and hip abnormalities. They search for other factors to get all possible information. This helps breeders make the best choice for deciding which dogs to breed. It's possible to perform the PennHIP test on puppies that are four months old at the earliest. The sooner owners know if their pet has hip dysplasia or is at high risk to develop it the better they can prepare. Any dog that gets the PennHIP screening will receive sedation. It requires your vet to go through specific training to be allowed to run the test. When it comes to cost, the PennHIP is more expensive than the OFA screening. Both of the screening tests have their benefits, but studies show the PennHIP to be more accurate. Despite this, the OFA is the standard test used in the United States. You aren't required to run these tests, but they can provide useful information. Knowing your dog has sensitive hips that might worsen over time, can help you better care for them. How to Treat Hip Dysplasia in Dogs Hip dysplasia is a progressive condition. It will get more severe over time with the end result will being a decline in health and loss of function. New advancements are being made every day, so this may not be true in the near future. For now, there are some treatment options currently available. The impact will vary on a case-by-case basis. Effective treatments will focus on pain management above all else. Even though the disease itself is progressive, you can stop it from developing. Arthritis and osteoporosis often originate from hip dysplasia. Juvenile Hip Dysplasia The only exception to the rule is Juvenile hip dysplasia. It's possible that with the right treatment, the joint will stabilize as the puppy matures. As soon as you suspect your young dog may be suffering, bring them to the vet. If your dog has juvenile hip dysplasia, you can work out a treatment plan. A standard plan will include moderate exercise, physical therapy, and pain management. Medications and Holistic Options Arthritis and hip dysplasia share many similar signs and symptoms. Because of this, many of the medications meant to treat one will work for the other. Oral joint support chews are an easy way to ease the pain. Anti-inflammatory medications work well for many adult dogs. When choosing a medication with the guidance of your vet, you should look for supplements that reduce swelling and improve joint strength. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are reliable for treating hip dysplasia. Studies show that they are effective for treating pain and osteoporosis.  Analgesics, when used with NSAIDs, offer additional pain relief. Other medications that work in a similar way as analgesics are tramadol and codeine. Some herbs can also alleviate pain. Dandelion and nettle help repair joints. Licorice and yucca have anti-inflammatory qualities. Alfalfa relieves pain. Rosemary and Hawthorne will improve blood circulation. With proper medication and care it's very common for dogs with hip dysplasia to live a long and happy life. Scientific advancements make it possible for them to be pain-free. Exercise and Physical Therapy To prevent further degeneration of the joints, varied exercise is highly recommended. Talk with a professional to create a workout plan. Too much exercise can cause joint and muscle damage. The best workout plans will help your dog maintain a healthy weight. They involve low to moderate impact exercises. Surgery If caught early enough, surgery is a valid treatment option. For dogs under 1 year, there are a few choices. For older dogs, surgery is still a possibility and there's a high rate of recovery. The only downsides to surgery are the aftercare and overall expense. After-care is just as vital to your dogs' healing as the surgery itself. It can be the difference between a full recovery and permanent damage. Always follow all after-care instructions rigorously!  The cost of the surgery is difficult to factor in when deciding if it's a valid option. It may save money down the road if you don't have to constantly buy medications and pay for physical therapy. For some, this is a cheaper choice. A few factors that will impact the cost of the procedure are your dog's breed, age, and health history. The type of procedure, whether it's performed by a clinic or private practice will impact the price. Ranges for hip dysplasia surgeries are large. Insurance claims can be between $1,500-$7,000. There are a lot of variables that only you can calculate. Even though it can come with a scary price tag, surgery has high rates of success. Most of the procedures listed below have at least an 80 percent success rate. It's up to you as the owner to decide what the best treatment is. Juvenile Pubic Symphysiodesis Juvenile Pubic Symphysiodesis has a high success rate. It has to be performed when your dog is around four to five months old. This minimally invasive procedure can help repair the hip joint and prevent arthritis. Your puppy will be under the effects of general anesthesia. This will put them in an unconscious state. It's done to prevent pain and to keep them stationary. There are some risks involved with anesthesia. Side effects can range anywhere from swelling and irritation to anaphylactic shock and death. If your dog has a bad history with anesthesia your surgeon needs to know. If your dog's never been under anesthesia, you can run tests to determine if any underlying conditions will impact your dog's health. Chemistry tests to evaluate the liver, sugar levels, and kidney can be administered. A complete blood count test checks for blood-related problems. An electrolyte test will make sure your dog is properly hydrated. It looks for an electrolyte imbalance. With a professional's input, you can decide whether or not anesthesia is worth the risk. There are precautions the vet will have you take in preparation to minimize the anesthesia's effects. Fasting before the surgery is common. This is to prevent your dog from vomiting. Excessive vomiting can lead to a condition called aspiration pneumonia. It could be fatal.  Your dog will be monitored throughout the entire procedure. Once your dog is unconscious, the surgeon will make a small incision between the hind legs to reveal the pubic bone and pelvis. To stop the pubis bone from growing, it will be cauterized. When successful, this procedure stops the center of the pelvis from growing and the rest of the pelvis continues to develop. It causes the hip socket to rotate and cover more of the ball joint. This means a stronger hip. Aftercare is important after any surgery. Your surgeon will give you discharge instructions that are non-negotiable. Limit activity for about two weeks after the procedure. Examine the incision scar for any signs of infection daily. Use any pain medications prescribed. Double or Triple Pelvic Osteotomy Double or Triple Pelvic Osteotomy is for puppies between the ages of six to 12 months that have hip dysplasia, but not arthritis. Also done under anesthesia, it has a 90 percent success rate. During this operation, the surgeon will rotate the pelvis to align it with the hip. After the surgeon cuts the pelvis, screws hold it together. Potential side effects include infection, urinary problems, and sciatic nerve pain. These usually occur because proper aftercare procedure was not followed.  For two months after surgery, limit your dog's exercise. Too much activity will cause the plates and screws that are holding the bone in place to loosen. In extreme cases, they even break. Medications will be prescribed after the surgery. Make sure any bandages or coverings are clean and dry. For two weeks your dog needs to wear a sling to protect from falling. You will have follow-up appointments scheduled. Six weeks after surgery you will have your second follow-up appointment. Your vet will run X-rays to measure improvements. In most cases, the healing process takes three to four months. Femoral Head Ostectomy Femoral Head Ostectomy is very affordable compared with other surgical options. It's recommended for dogs over 12 months who weigh less than 40 pounds. Young and mature dogs can benefit from this treatment. In preparation for the surgery, your dog's hind leg hairs will be clipped. They will be under general anesthesia.   The femoral head is completely removed during the procedure. This eliminates the source of pain which is bone rubbing on bone. After surgery, the joint will become stabile by scarring which makes a false joint. The scarring is between the acetabulum and femur providing a cushion. As with all surgeries, aftercare is just as important, if not more so, than the actual procedure. For a full recovery, your dog will have to exercise. Physical therapy will most likely include swimming to increase the range of motion. Follow all instructions regarding medications. Never stop before you are told to by a professional. Dogs cannot express pain the same way humans can. Even if they look fine, they still need the correct doses of pain medication. Recovery varies based on your dog's age, but after two to three months they should be fully recovered.  Total Hip Replacement Total Hip Replacement is for large dog breeds. Specifically, those that have seen no improvement with other non-surgical treatments. There is a high chance of infection, but it has a 90 percent success rate. Total hip replacement is a salvage procedure. It's reserved for large mature dogs in debilitating pain. The ones who have not responded to other therapies.  To prepare your dog beforehand, you should bathe and dry them. Make sure they stay as clean as possible. There is a high risk of infection with this surgery so you need to be careful. You also need to shave their leg. General anesthesia will be used. The surgeon will make an incision at the hip area and remove the ball and socket. To replace the bones, a plastic cup connects to the acetabulum, and a steel implant is placed in the femur. You will have to stay in the hospital for a night or two after the surgery. Once home, give your dog the prescribed medications. This will include anti-inflammatories and other oral pain prescriptions. Use them until gone. Look for signs of infection near the incision. Common signs of infection are redness, heat, and swelling. A few days after surgery, your dog should be able to put weight on its hind legs. For two months you will have to severely limit exercise. Only take your dog outside when needed. Because of the long sedentary period, your dog will lose muscle mass. Physical therapy helps remedy this. Dog Hip Braces An important part of recovery from surgery is not putting pressure on the hip joint. Dog hip braces allow mobility without jeopardizing recovery. Not all dogs are eligible for surgery, for them, hip braces are a pain management option. An orthopedic brace can help puppies who are showing signs of developing hip dysplasia. They provide support and stability to lessen the impact on the hip joint. Recent Treatment Breakthroughs These are not available for public use due to further testing being needed. They show that new treatments may not be far from grasp. Researchers found that using platelet-rich plasma, in addition to physical therapy, helped increase limb function. Stem cells combined with hyaluronic acid seem to improve hip joint range of motion. For both experiments, no negative side effects were noted. A small number of dogs were tested. More study is needed with larger sample sizes. Living with Hip Dysplasia In the future, there may be more treatment options for hip dysplasia. For now, odds are your dog can still live a long and happy life with this disease. Maintaining a healthy weight will reduce the impact on your dog's hip joint. Physical therapy can help you create a workout plan and your vet can give you some diet suggestions. Do this to promote mobility and muscle strength. Acupuncture helps some dogs manage their pain when used with physical therapy.  Temperature affects your dog's hip joint. Avoiding cold weather will help them.  Find a dry warm spot for them to sleep. Learn how to keep your dog comfortable in colder weather. Keeping them off the ground, buying a space heater, and piling them under blankets are a great start. Putting down rugs or carpets over slippery floors prevents them from falling. Putting in a ramp so your dog doesn't have to walk upstairs makes the transition easier. Life Expectancy Hip dysplasia should not affect your dog's life expectancy. You will have to watch their weight and joint flexibility more often. Remaining active can be hard if it is painful for your dog. It's a scary, but manageable condition. There are many dogs diagnosed with it that live relatively pain-free lives. Schedule consistent vet appointments. Your dog should take a trip to the vet every six months. A physical check-up will ensure that you're providing the best treatment and care possible. What Can You Do? Take your furry friend to the vet! Routine appointments can save your dog from a lot of pain. Do more research! There's so much more information that we didn't cover here. Branch out and find out what you can about this common disease. Take care of your dog! If your dog has hip dysplasia, do everything you can. Surgery is expensive and not every dog is eligible. There is a myriad of other treatments available that are worth trying. Hip dysplasia in dogs is scary and painful. You may feel limited by treatments options and invasive surgeries, but there are courses of action you can take. Every dog deserves a long and happy life.
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  • Owning a dog is a huge responsibility. Looking after them, training them, and keeping them happy are all part of being a good pet owner. If you’ve been considering adopting a new fur baby, or you’re curious, here is a comprehensive list of the most obedient dog breeds.
    https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/the-25-most-obedient-dog-breeds
    Owning a dog is a huge responsibility. Looking after them, training them, and keeping them happy are all part of being a good pet owner. If you’ve been considering adopting a new fur baby, or you’re curious, here is a comprehensive list of the most obedient dog breeds. https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/the-25-most-obedient-dog-breeds
    The 25 Most Obedient Dog Breeds
    Who’s a good boy? Not the dog busy rummaging through the garbage… When it comes to training your dog to be “good”, it isn’t a matter of intelligence. The smartest dogs can be stubborn and free-willed. Obedience comes down to a balance of intelligence, eagerness to please, and training. And while you can train all dogs, some breeds take to it quicker than others. Owning a dog is a huge responsibility. Looking after them, training them, and keeping them happy are all part of being a good pet owner. If you’ve been considering adopting a new fur baby, or you’re curious, here is a comprehensive list of the most obedient dog breeds. 1. Labrador Retriever A popular dog breed, and America’s favorite for the last 30 years, the Labrador Retriever is friendly, energetic, and eager to please. They are often considered an ideal first pet as you begin learning how to train dogs.   These clever pups love a challenge, which makes training them a pleasure. Their ease of training and their calm and gentle nature has made them a top choice for guide dogs around the world. As a reward for their efforts, they enjoy the main two options for dogs' treats: food and games of fetch. It’s important to balance these two as Labradors are prone to obesity. 2. German Shepherd German shepherds were bred for their responsiveness and obedience. We often see German shepherds trained to be police dogs, guide dogs, service dogs, and search and rescue dogs.  German shepherds are loyal and protective, making them wonderful family dogs. Make sure to train them to prevent aggression towards unfamiliar people and dogs. 3. Vizsla Vizslas are an enthusiastic and intelligent breed. They are incredibly loyal once they’ve formed attachments to their owners, and will do anything to impress and please them. These boisterous canines need regular exercise, and training is an easy way to use up their seemingly endless energy. 4. Golden Retriever This sweet-faced breed has a gentle, playful, and loving nature. They are great family pets and love the mental stimulation of a good training session. These pups were actually bred to be hunting dogs! Determined and strong, they respond well to training and can become obedient and well-behaved pets. 5. English Springer Spaniel Another energetic breed, the English springer spaniel is always looking for a task to do. They are excellent retrievers with a good nose, making them perfect for dog sports.   These joyful dogs love playing, wagging their tails, and feeling helpful. To them, there’s nothing better than carrying your wallet into the house for you. 6. Poodle A poodle has more than just a pretty face. Intelligent and elegant, these pups are devoted to their owners and love learning new and often complex tricks. They are agile and athletic, making them perfect contenders for dog sports.   7. Border Collie Border collies are one of the smartest dog breeds. They have an unmatched understanding of their humans; they stay in tune with the people and pets around them. They are quick and eager to learn, with a strong work ethic and a love of activity. These clever dogs could be better-named boredom collies because they need a huge amount of mental enrichment to keep them from destroying household items or digging up your yard. This behavior isn’t malicious – they just hate not having something to do! Another thing they don't enjoy is being left alone. Border collies are prone to separation anxiety, which can be eased with anxiety chews for dogs.  8. Keeshond Curious and friendly, the keeshond’s calm demeanor can make their intelligence come as a surprise. They love learning new things and will excel in dog sports due to their natural athleticism. Because they were bred to be watchdogs, Keeshonds can get quite carried away when barking at strangers. But with a little extra training, you can stop alert barking from getting out of paw. 9. Havanese While most small dog breeds are known to be headstrong and stubborn, the little Havanese are attentive and eager to please. They thrive on positive reinforcement and will do almost anything for a belly rub and a cuddle. They can become quite shy if they don’t interact with enough people and other dogs, which makes puppy school the perfect place to train them. 10. Manchester Terrier Manchester terriers have all the responsiveness and intelligence of other terriers, without the feistiness. These pups love being busy, so they tend to focus during training. Be sure to keep training sessions interesting and challenging so these clever dogs don’t get too bored or frustrated. 11. Doberman Pinscher Doberman pinschers have a reputation for aggression, but this aggression comes purely from a lack of training. Loyal and protective by nature, a Doberman pinscher responds quickly to training. This clever breed often plays the role of a guard dog or protection dog, becoming playful and loving under the right ownership and care. 12. Shetland Sheepdog   Shetland sheepdogs are loyal, attentive, and brave. Often described as “shadow dogs”, Shetland sheepdogs form unshakeable bonds with their humans. Combined with their eagerness to please, this loyalty makes them eager to be obedient and easy to train.  Shetland sheepdogs don't tend to display destructive behavior when bored, so you can get away with basic obedience training. But they love a challenge and thrive on the encouragement they get while learning something new. 13. Papillon The Papillon is a gorgeous toy dog that responds surprisingly well to training. They love performing to gain positive reinforcement, so they often learn tricks to show off to their owners. Their playful nature gets them into trouble if they don’t receive proper training, so they require lots of engagement and mental stimulation to keep entertained. 14. Rottweiler Rottweilers are a unique breed in that they not only respond well to training, but they crave it. Training is essential to ensure they don't assume a dominant role.     Their reputation for aggression comes from misunderstanding and their protectiveness. Actually, this is a devoted dog that is known to be loving and affectionate with its humans. 15. Australian Cattle Dog With their active minds and high energy levels, Australian cattle dogs are known for their intelligence and independence. These unfettered pooches choose to obey because it makes them happy, not because they feel the need to please. They make brilliant guard dogs as they aren’t too fond of strangers, and remain alert and wary when encountering unfamiliar people. Although loyal and affectionate with their immediate family, their hunt-oriented breeding means they instinctively herd and guard. This can be difficult to train out of them, so families with small children might not be the best fit. 16. Australian Shepherd A different Aussie dog, the Australian shepherd, easily adopts the role of the family pet. One of their differences from the cattle dog is that they are easier to train. With enough patience and rigorous training, you can teach them not to try ‘herding’ your children! It’s important to socialize Australian shepherds while they are still young to teach them to enjoy new situations, environments, people, and pets. Otherwise, these devoted pups can become overprotective of their humans. 17. Pembroke Welsh Corgi Pembroke Welsh corgis are some of the most agreeable house dogs. They were bred for herding, which makes them eager to learn and easy to train. Corgis are affectionate without being needy and enjoy meeting new people and pets. Early socialization encourages development into a well-mannered, friendly adult. Positive reinforcement and reward-based training is the best method for these sweet dogs. This is a breed with a sense of humor. Corgis are known to chase children around the yard during playtime! 18. Miniature Schnauzer There’s nothing miniature about miniature schnauzers’ energy! These boisterous pets require gentle but firm discipline to balance out their energetic nature. Outgoing, friendly, and excitable, these dogs are not aggressive in the slightest. They need to be taught how to politely greet guests and other animals. They are intelligent and bright companions who love vigorous playtime. They quickly bore of repetition so training sessions need to be unique and challenging, but they are alert and ready to listen. 19. Belgian Tervuren Large and in charge, the Belgian Tervuren is one of the most obedient dogs you can find. They are another herding breed with a ton of extra energy, so they need to be trained somewhere with a lot of space. They can be nervous around strangers, but once they are comfortable with a person they can turn any activity into a game. The most effective training methods take advantage of this! Harsh discipline quickly discourages this sweet dog, but making the task fun for them works wonders. Belgian Tervurens love mastering new tasks.    Their elegance and agility complement their hardworking nature, making them a delight to train. 20. Belgian Schipperke Widely regarded as a stubborn breed, the Belgian Schnipperke are headstrong but respond well to careful training. They are small and fiery and need guidance when finding ways to channel their excessive energy. Watchful by nature, Schipperkes must be taught from a young age that excessive barking will not be tolerated. They are also curious and adventurous, so teaching them to come when called is vital. 21. Pomeranian Pomeranians are well known for being affectionate and joyful lap dogs. Their smiling face mirrors their happy personalities, while their ears give away their alert intelligence. These pups love making their humans happy, and will quickly learn tricks if you let them know how clever they are. This is a breed that thrives on attention and encouragement. Pomeranians excel with agility, rally, and obedience activities, and work well as therapy dogs. 22. German Shorthaired Pointer Regal and boisterous, the German shorthaired pointer is an eccentric dog breed known for being good with older children. Training is important for this breed to know where to channel its energy. Destructive behaviors are a sign of boredom for this pooch, as they are not malicious by nature. They love exploring but don’t enjoy being alone for extended periods of time, so they will often try to get you to come exploring with them. When trained correctly, this is an easy-going and loving pet who is always up for playtime. 23. Cocker Spaniel Cocker spaniels are known for being gentle and merry. Bred to hunt birds, these dogs are wonderful companions. The sweet nature of a cocker spaniel makes them ideal for families with children, as they are easily trained and happy to play gently. They don’t have the endless pit of energy that other hunting dogs do, so they will often lie at your feet waiting for you to play. The cocker spaniel is the poster-dog for people-pleasing. They are sensitive to your tone during training and hate disappointing their humans. Their favorite rewards are food and attention. Their sensitivity makes harsh correction unnecessary and even counter-productive. 24. Bernese Mountain Dog The sweet and affectionate nature of the Bernese mountain dog contrasts with its strong, powerful build. These dogs are as clever as they are strong, and love learning tricks to please their favorite person.  The size of large dog breeds makes obedience training a non-negotiable. Be careful with disciplining them as their feelings are easily hurt. They will not respond well to harsh correction or training methods. These big pooches don’t enjoy being left alone for too long and can develop undesirable behaviors when they feel lonely. 25. Greyhound Another hunting dog, Greyhounds are known for being swift racing dogs. Known for agility and grace, these dogs have a sweet and people-pleasing nature. Little geniuses, greyhounds pick up on commands and new tricks at the speed of light.  Greyhounds are sensitive to harsh weather and loneliness. They thrive on attention, treats, and cuddles. Surprisingly, this is a dog breed that doesn't need much exercise. Their breeding for racing focused on speed rather than endurance!  Looking After The Most Obedient Dog Breeds All dogs can learn to be obedient with enough patient training and gentle guidance. If you have been looking for the perfect dog to fit into your home, we hope this list of the most obedient dog breeds will help narrow down your search.  Whatever obedience-loving pup you bring home, make sure they feel welcome with a dog bed from Bully Beds. From the smallest pomeranian to the biggest Burmese mountain dog, we've got the perfect beds for your furry best friends. 
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  • Why do dogs scratch their bed? Scratching before bed is normal, but if your dog goes overboard, you can help him relax and feel more comfortable with a new bed or blanket. Read more here...
    https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/why-do-dogs-scratch-their-bed
    Why do dogs scratch their bed? Scratching before bed is normal, but if your dog goes overboard, you can help him relax and feel more comfortable with a new bed or blanket. Read more here... https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/why-do-dogs-scratch-their-bed
    Why Do Dogs Scratch Their Bed?
    If we adopted our dog's bedtime habits, we'd jump on the bed, run in circles a couple of times, scratch at the duvet, dig up the bedding, then flop down ready for a good sleep. That would be weird, right? Have you ever watched your dog going through the motions, and wondered what he was thinking? Why do dogs scratch their bed? Figuring out why our dog digs, scratches, and circles, will need some digging around in the past. Here are some of the reasons behind our dog's strange habits and what we can do about them.   Why Do Dogs Dig In Bed? Where This Habit Comes From Way back before dogs were man’s best friend, they lived in the wild. Their habits kept them alive. Digging, scratching, and circling were all part of finding a safe place to sleep each night. Let's take a look at where the four different behaviors originated. Digging Dogs in the wild slept out in the open, exposed to the weather and predators. They would dig up their sleeping spots for two main reasons.  Temperature Regulation Under extreme hot or cold conditions, a dog's tendency to dig a sleeping hollow had a lot to do with warming up or cooling down. In icy cold conditions, dogs would dig down into the soil to find shelter and warmth.  In hot weather, digging a hollow into the soil offered the dog an opportunity to cool down. Dogs regulate their temperature through their footpads. Digging puts their footpads in direct contact with the cool soil.    Territorial Marking Dogs are eager territory markers and will often urinate on objects to stake their claim. This isn't the only way they can stamp their name on something. Dogs have scent glands in their paws that will mark the area they're digging in with their scent. Digging is a dog's way of claiming its spot. What to us may seem like a trashed blanket, will actually be something the dog has marked as its own. Dogs are creatures of habit and will happily return to a spot that carries their scent. Scratching Scratching is less destructive than digging and is all about the dog's comfort. Just as we fluff our pillows before bed, scratching is also a way of making a hard surface soft and comfortable. Breaking up a hard surface creates a softer surface to sleep on. Why do dogs scratch at the bed? It would move leaves and underbrush in to cover the bare dirt to make sleeping more comfortable.  Circling The habit of circling a few times before lying down has been linked back to wolves. Before sleeping, a wild wolf would turn a few circles with their noses in the air. This helped them to find which direction the wind was coming from. They'd sleep facing the oncoming wind to warn them of the approach of an enemy. Circling also had to do with tramping down the grass and leaves to make a comfier sleeping place. For warmth, wild dogs would circle in together and snuggle up to share body heat. Circling has the added bonus of driving out any snakes, rats, or other critters that could cause problems for dogs. Burrowing Does your dog enjoy making a blanket fort? In the wild, dogs burrowed under dirt and leaves to create an insulated space to protect them from temperature extremes. It also provides camouflage to hide the dog's position and helps them feel less vulnerable. This burrowing instinct is what causes our dogs to bury themselves under their blankets, too.  Why Do Dogs Scratch Their Bed Now?  As dogs became domesticated, the need to do things for survival has fallen away, but behavior patterns remained written into their genes. When survival instincts show up in our safe, happy homes, they sure look strange. Even though their actions aren't necessary for survival our dog's behavior can help us understand our fur buddies. Here are some other reasons a dog may take to digging in his bed. Curiosity It might be an interesting smell or the noise of something moving underneath the blankets that make your dog dig. Dogs are curious explorers by nature and a whiff or a squeak can set them off on a digging spree.  Stress or Anxiety Might Increase the Digging Dogs feel anxious if there are changes at home such as the addition of a new pet or family member. Stressed dogs will tend to dig and scratch more. There is a fine line between scratching to relax or scratching out of anxiety. If you notice that the pre-bed scratch is stressing your dog out more than calming them down, you can try distracting her with another toy. If you don't manage to bring down her anxiety levels, it might be time to talk to your vet.   Copy-Cat Bed-Scratching Introducing a new dog to the family might make the existing dog's bed-scratching habits worse. Part of this could be territorial, but if the new dog is a happy-digger, it can easily rub off on the rest of the pack. Maternal Instinct A female dog close to delivering her puppies will go on a bed-scratching frenzy. Behavior like this is part of the canine nesting instinct and it's caused mostly by hormones. Her digging is to create a nest for her new pups to keep them warm and safe.   Territorial Behavior Dogs are more likely to return to a bedding spot if they already feel it’s theirs. This may be why bed-scratching behaviors sometimes begin or intensify when a new pet or person has moved into the house, or there has been another type of major change in the household. When Does Digging or Scratching Become a Problem?   Digging and other destructive behaviors can be hard to train out of our dogs. as it is linked to a survival instinct. Part of surviving in the wild was the ability to make a safe, comfortable shelter. But when do these instincts cross a line and become a problem? If our dogs destroy each new bed that we buy for them, or damage our wooden floors or other parts of our home by scratching, we'll need to address the issue. While our dog's instincts can never be removed completely, there are ways of minimizing the damage that they cause.  3 Ways to Scratch-Proof Your Dog's Bed Digging and scratching aren't a problem until our dogs destroy something. An excited dog can convert a brand new pet bed to a ripped pile of fabric and stuffing without much effort. While we may not be able to get our dogs to stop completely, there are some things we can do to lessen the damage caused.  1. Give Your Pooch a Nail Cut A dog manicure once a month will keep our dog's nails short enough to prevent damage to his sleeping spot. It will also protect the rest of our furniture and wooden floors. Keeping our dog's nails short is healthier and will prevent the nails from infections. After trimming, file down sharp edges.  2.  Give Them Other Ways to Play If we find our dogs tearing up their bed as a game, not a pre-sleep ritual it could mean that they are under-stimulated. We can get them some new, interesting, toys. Make their walks a bit longer. Find other ways for the dogs to exercise. Keeping them occupied and happy will help make their bed last longer.  3. Invest in a Tougher Bed Cheap dog beds are made from inferior fabric and stuffing that won't survive a dog's digging habit. Choose a dog bed with a durable cover that's designed to last. A comfortable bed might make it easier for our dogs to get cozy without too much scratching.  Other Ways to Stop Your Dog Digging If comfort was the only reason dogs dig, correcting their behavior would be a simple matter of buying a comfortable bed. Instincts still run strong though, and we'll need to try some other strategies to preserve your dog's bed. Try a Different Type of Bed Changing the type of bed our dog is using might help him get comfortable quicker. We can try a different type of bed such as memory foam, or a faux fur comforter bed.  Doggy Blanket Pile Fill your dog's sleeping area with a pile of blankets. He can use them to snuggle into and make a den where he is comfortable. Consider changing his blankets. You can experiment with different thicknesses and textures until you find a combination that really works for your dog. Territorial Digging? Don't Do This If you find your dog scratching or digging up their bed for territorial reasons, don't wash his blankets or pillows. Clean bedding won't smell like him and might make him scratch even more. Move The Location of the Bed Your dog may be scratching from stress if his bed is in a place that's too busy. Try moving his bed to a quieter, darker location or an area that is slightly more enclosed.   To Worry, or Not To Worry? If you have a dog that digs, scratches, or circles, don't worry! It is a completely natural way for dogs to behave. Young dogs and old dogs are prone to it. It might start when they are puppies or only when they are older.  Did you cause your dog's digging habit? Nope, not at all. Does your dog have a mental problem? Not likely. All dog owners face the same issue.  What Makes a Dog Bed Great? For a dog bed to check all the boxes, it needs to be comfortable for the dog and be too strong to be chewed apart. An added bonus is a layer of waterproofing for protection from soiling. Strong, indestructible zips are a must. Here's a handy checklist for things to look for in a dog bed: A removable, washable, microfiber cover A waterproof liner Chew resistant, heavy-duty zips Non-slip base Memory foam For older dogs with arthritis - infrared dog bed For cold climates or seasons - a heated bed 20-year warranty Bully Beds offer all these things in their extensive range of dog beds that were designed with man's best friend in mind.  Blankets Matter The right dog blanket can make a big difference for a dog. The latest trend is toward faux fur blankets that are waterproof, soft, easy to wash, and offer your dog a level of comfort that will leave them feeling secure and happy. These blankets work well with dog beds, but can also be used to protect the furniture in houses where dogs share the couch. If your dog loves going for a drive, his waterproof blanket will protect the car seats too.  Consider a Crate Pad If your dog doesn't go for one of the more traditional beds, he may be better suited to a dog crate. The lining you choose for your dog's crate needs to be chew-resistant, water-resistant, easy to clean, and comfortable for your dog. The foam inside needs to be safe and non-toxic for dogs, just in case a persistent pooch manages to chew all the way through. Time For a New Dog Bed? Why do dogs scratch their bed? Scratching before bed is normal, but if your dog goes overboard, you can help him relax and feel more comfortable with a new bed or blanket. We have a range of beds to choose from. There is a bed suitable for every size and shape of dog. You can browse our selection on our website. Our fur buddy's natural instincts don't have to give us gray hair. We can give him a perfectly tailored sleep solution, and see how relaxed and happy he'll be. 
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  • Keep in mind that caring for your dog doesn’t stop at sharing your home with him. This involves a plethora of responsibilities to keep him safe, and healthy all the time.
    https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/simple-ways-to-keeping-a-dog-bed-clean
    Keep in mind that caring for your dog doesn’t stop at sharing your home with him. This involves a plethora of responsibilities to keep him safe, and healthy all the time. https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/simple-ways-to-keeping-a-dog-bed-clean
    3 Simple Ways To Keeping A Dog Bed Clean
    Everyone including our pet dogs loves a good night's sleep. Just like us, dogs often enjoy a quality dog bed for all of the same reasons. Ultimately, the option of whether or not to provide a bed for our dog is a unique and individual decision from one owner to another. Since we have a history with animals allowing them to sleep among us especially during the cold season. The bond with which we share with our beloved pets is indeed strengthened through years and years of mutual love, not to mention the fact that canines, in general, tend to look at their owners as the alpha in the pack. You may have a dog that is a member of your family already or have recently gotten a new furry little friend. It may seem pretty obvious, but dog beds are an integral part of your dog’s well-being, so getting one that bests suits his (and yours) needs is something requiring a little bit of thought. There are fabric 'donut' style beds, and the pillow-style beds are a nice idea too, like big squishy beanbags, but anything soft or furry will help encourage your puppy/ies to stay there. With the dogs’ sleeping habits come the many instances in which they get all too comfortable in their beds. So much so that there are some situations that an “accident” is inevitable (especially in geriatric dogs and puppies in training). Drooling, which is common in large breed dogs, can make the bed smell unpleasant. Dogs too have a love for the outdoors, and getting inside their beds after a rough and tumble play outside can bring in some dirt and mud. If not cleaned right away these can accumulate in their bed which hardens over time. Also, dogs get fleas and ticks that can hide in their comfy beds, pillows, blankets, even toys. Using flea and tick powder for your dog as a treatment is helpful, even having him wear a flea collar. But if there are fleas in his bedding, the reinfestation will happen again and again. Putting flea powder on the bed won’t help and is not as effective as you may think. Getting rid of pests involves washing the bed, and ensuring you have a product ready for both the dog, and his belongings. Dog hairs can accumulate in their beds, too. One of the reasons why washing your dog bed clean can be difficult, and thorough cleaning must be made. Dogs of larger breeds obviously are quite big and strong. They sometimes fall asleep in the hallway or in front of doors, or on the floor heading upstairs. These are inconvenient places and therefore a nice, warm, and comfy bed is what they need. These dogs ---- depending on the breed --- also tend to drool and cleaning drool off of their bedding can be a little difficult.  A washable dog bed is worth considering here, not only is it easy to keep clean but if your dog is spending more time in there, there's less drool to deal with. You can of course add blankets or pillows if you feel your dog needs to be a little snuggly as ever.  Getting the right bed for your dog is quite important, from both training and your dog’s well-being. The right one will ensure you and your dog can live in harmony and will love you more for having his own 'haven' and this can only help improve your friendship with him. Puppies Part of your puppy’s training is having to stay in a warm, snuggly bed. Dogs trained early on will pick up a lot of the lessons that were given to them, and it’s easily more so with puppies. Young as they are, it’s better to regularly check their bed for bodily wastes, fleas, and other unwanted items they took to play with. Also, make it a point to keep their bedding clean at all times to avoid the stench that will arise if ignored. Whelping Dog Moms Pregnant dogs need all the care they can get. This is especially crucial in whelping dogs. Around the time of going into labor up to the point of giving birth to puppies, expect their bed to get a little messy, which means you have to change sheets, blankets, pillows, and even clean the entire bed as frequently as possible. It will help if you have an extra dog bed in cases like this. As the puppies grow, so is your responsibility of regular cleaning and maintenance to keep the newly birthed puppies and their mom safe and healthy. Geriatric Dogs Like any other animal, dogs experience all sorts of discomfort once they reach old age. There are dog breeds that are susceptible to a specific ailment or two, such as hip dysplasia in Great Danes.  And there are some dogs that experience early onset of canine arthritis, causing uncomfortable joint pains and swelling in the affected bodily parts. It’s better to pay more attention to their behavior and the way they settle inside their beds. In cases like this, if you own an older dog who’s experiencing discomfort, you may have to start checking his bed for any signs of dried drool, urine, or fecal matter. Doing this makes his place takes away a portion of his health problem, not to mention you are actually helping them cope as easily and comfortably as possible. To Keep Your Dog Bed Clean, Do These 3 Simple Ways The importance of a bed for your dog cannot be stressed enough. Dogs need a place to relax and sleep day and night.  Perhaps the most important reason is that if your dog has his bed inside your home, wouldn't you want to be able to keep it clean? Consider this seriously: washing the sheets regularly to keep them clean and fresh. Why wouldn't you want your pet to have a clean bed to lie on? Cleanliness inside the home has its many benefits not just for you, but for your dog as well. If your pet only gets to sleep in a largely improvised box-bed and has lots of sheets in it, unchanged bedding will get to emit an unpleasant scent that is overpowering if unattended for a long time. To get a better handle on cleaning your dog bed, here are 3 simple ways to do so: 1) Use A Cat Brush Cat brush is a highly recommended tool to get loose hair off of your dog’s bedding and blanket. It may take you a while to finish, but it is an important and necessary step in cleaning. Washing sheets will leave wet hair that sticks like glue to the insides of the washer and will clog the dryer lint basket. The great thing about washable dog beds is that they are made to be washed. When done regularly, the chances of a dog bed ending up a breeding place for mites or fleas and other bugs are minimal to none. 2) Use An Enzymatic Cleaner For Pets Spray the bed on both sides with an enzymatic cleaner and let it sit for about 5 minutes to completely soak in. In the absence of this type of cleaner, you may use baking soda or apple cider, or white vinegar. 3) Put The Dog Bed In The Washer Fold the bed and run it through a regular wash cycle with detergent. The downside is that some wet fur will stick on the washer lid if there’s some left on the bedding.  But if you have already removed most of the hair before washing them, simply brush the bed again and use paper towels for any hair that’s left on the bedding and in the washer and dryer to avoid clogging. Maintaining A Clean Dog Bed Should Be Easier Than You Think No doubt, a dog that is lovingly given his own bed can grow attached to it, making it his own, his prized possession. It is his lair, a place in which he can relax and sleep for as long as he likes. But after a while, the bed eventually becomes dirty and soiled. Of course, nobody wants the stench lingering in your home all the time, day in and day out. Cleaning and maintenance for the dog bed only make so much sense for health and safety reasons. And, because dogs are part of human families, the best thing you can give your dog in terms of comfort and health is a washable dog bed, pillows, and blankets. There is a wide range of washable pillows or even bean bags designed especially for dogs. If you’re planning on getting one, only choose the highly recommended dog beds and other accessories. Choose a dog bed that is soft, making it easier to clean and wash.  These washable dog beds will always retain their softness regardless of washing and cleaning frequency. Keep in mind that caring for your dog doesn’t stop at sharing your home with him. This involves a plethora of responsibilities to keep him safe, and healthy all the time.
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  • Now, extend the life of your dog's favourite sleeping spot with our plush upholstery made washable dog bed covers. Easy to remove & machine washable. Order now!
    https://bullybeds.com/collections/covers
    Now, extend the life of your dog's favourite sleeping spot with our plush upholstery made washable dog bed covers. Easy to remove & machine washable. Order now! https://bullybeds.com/collections/covers
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  • Dog Sleep Apnea: Common causes of sleep apnea in dogs include allergies, being overweight, and obstructions in the dog's airway and nasal passages. Read more!
    https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/45718657-dog-sleep-apnea
    Dog Sleep Apnea: Common causes of sleep apnea in dogs include allergies, being overweight, and obstructions in the dog's airway and nasal passages. Read more! https://bullybeds.com/blogs/news/45718657-dog-sleep-apnea
    Dog Sleep Apnea
    You know the sensation of trying and trying to fall asleep, but being kept awake because your sleeping partner won't stop snoring. But have you ever had that experience while sharing a bedroom with your dog? If your pooch sounds like a rumbling freight train when he falls asleep, maybe you should be asking yourself "Does my dog have sleep apnea?" Sleep Apnea in Pets  You may be surprised to learn that dogs, like humans, can suffer from sleep disorders, including sleep apnea.  While snoring is sometimes just innocuous nightime noise, it can also be a warning sign for an underlying problem. Sleep apnea can be pretty serious for your pooch. The most severe cases can result in death, but even a mild instance can disrupt your dog's sleep. Symptoms include: Loud and frequent snoring Gasping or choking while sleeping Sleeping during the day Tiredness Irritability Common causes of sleep apnea in dogs include allergies, being overweight, and obstructions in the dog's airway and nasal passages. If your dog is overweight, please consider feeding a food for older dogs for the sake of his long-term health!  Achoo! Allergies and Apneas If your dog suffers from allergies, whether seasonal, caused by foods, or due to toxins in his environment, his allergies could inflame his airways to the point of blocking them off. A visit to his veterinarian is important because your vet can diagnose his problem and either prescribe a hypoallergenic diet or give him a prescription that will help his condition. Sometimes anti-inflammatory medications can be given. Also, essential oil based respiratory blends may be diffused in the dog’s sleep area. Consult a certified Aromatherapist or Holistic Veterinarian to aquire safe administration.  Pudgy Pooches Dogs suffering from sleep apnea are often overweight and need to shed a few pounds. Your veterinarian can provide the right type of food so that your dog can be fed normally and still lose some weight. Also, exercise is important, so make sure to get out for your daily walk! Just like humans, dogs need proper food and regular exercise for optimal health. A “couch” potato is NOT just a ‘spoiled dog’…it is a health issue waiting to appear! Feeding a species appropriate, high quality kibble, designed for weight loss is recommend: Nose Goes Sometimes you can predict your dog's sleep apnea risk just by looking at him! You see, some dog breeds with short noses (the fancy term for it is brachycephalic), like bulldogs and pugs, can suffer from copmlications due to obstructed airways.  In this case, your veterinarian may need to perform surgery so that your pup can get more than a cat nap. And he'll be happy to breathe easier. If you like to take a more holistic approach to assisting your dog in breathing easier, consult a pet Aromatherapist or Holistic Pet Professional for therapeutic, essential oil based respiratory blends such as these: www.essentialoils4pets.com (use promo code : BullyBeds) You may also want to consider a “calming blend” of essential oils to assist your dog in falling asleep faster, and stayng asleep. This will also help YOU get a better nights sleep as well! Here is a video link to see what sleep apnea looks like in a dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-7Y8yhcUiw  Proper support while sleeping is imperative for your pet. Bully Beds provide support and comfort throughout a pet’s life, and come with a 20 year guarantee. Why not start, today, with a proper sleep environment with a Bully Bed. Feel good about your pet’s good night sleep. Relax, knowing you are helping assist your pet to have a lifetime free of joint and muscle pain because Bully Beds provide the best support of any dog bed available.
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  • Looking for a Chew Resistant Bed? Click below link to check out our new 200 day guarantee chew resistant beds!
    https://bullybeds.com/products/guaranteed-chew-resistant-no-flat-waterproof-crate-pads
    Looking for a Chew Resistant Bed? Click below link to check out our new 200 day guarantee chew resistant beds! https://bullybeds.com/products/guaranteed-chew-resistant-no-flat-waterproof-crate-pads
    Chew Resistant Crate Pad With 200 Day Guarantee
    Looking for a Chew Resistant Bed? Click here to check out our new 200 day guarantee chew resistant beds! Our chew resistant crate pads are the ideal choice for your dog's crate. - Certipur US Certified Foam - Foam is free of PBDEs, TDCPP or TCEP (“Tris”) flame retardants, mercury, lead, heavy metals, formaldehyde, phthalates, CFC's. - If your dog chews it, we'll replace the bed AND cover for Free ( See Details Below) - Water Resistant  - Washable - Hidden Heavy Velcro Closure. No zippers used to prevent choking or intestinal blockages should your dog swallow anything. - 2" Thick Orthopedic Foam - 10 Year Guarantee On Foam   Crate Size   Large (33.5"x21") - Fits most 36" crates X Large (41"x26") - Fits most 42" crates XX Large (47"x26") - Fits most 48" crates Giant (53"x36") - Fits most 54" crates   Our Chew Resistant Crate Pad Guarantee If your dog manages to chew up and destroy one of our crate pads within 200 days of receipt, we'll happily provide a one-time replacement of the complete pad. It's that simple.  *** Please understand that although we sell these as durable and chew resistant, no dog bed or pad is 100% indestructible or chew proof. We do however feel and know that these pads offer a great option for dogs that are heavy chewers. To file a claim, contact us at [email protected] to notify us of the issue.  We'll need pictures of the destroyed bed and will require it be shipped back to us. IMPORTANT...The chew proof guarantee does not apply to any of our orthopedic standard or 3 sided bolster Bully Bed of any size or color.  The chew proof guarantee ONLY applies to the chew proof crate pads.
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  • All Bully Giant Dog Beds come standard with a high-quality cover designed to discourage chewing and offer comfort for your dog and protection to the interior foam. Click on the below link to select the correct size for your large breed dog.
    #GiantDogBeds #LargeDogBeds
    https://bullybeds.com/pages/giant-dog-beds
    All Bully Giant Dog Beds come standard with a high-quality cover designed to discourage chewing and offer comfort for your dog and protection to the interior foam. Click on the below link to select the correct size for your large breed dog. #GiantDogBeds #LargeDogBeds https://bullybeds.com/pages/giant-dog-beds
    Giant Breed Dog Beds | Largest Dog Bed | Bully Beds
    Why Bully Beds are the best washable giant breed dog beds On the Market. Largest dog beds that are cheaply made and fall apart almost immediately. Buy now!
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  • Great Danes are among the tallest of all breeds of dogs. One of the best known fictional Great Danes is Scooby Doo. They can grow up to about 31 inches tall and 180 pounds although the record holder for the breed stood at 44 inches in height.

    https://bullybeds.com/pages/great-dane-dog-beds
    Great Danes are among the tallest of all breeds of dogs. One of the best known fictional Great Danes is Scooby Doo. They can grow up to about 31 inches tall and 180 pounds although the record holder for the breed stood at 44 inches in height. https://bullybeds.com/pages/great-dane-dog-beds
    Great Dane Beds | Best Dog Bed for Great Dane | Bully Beds
    Great Danes are among the tallest of all breeds of dogs, best known fictional Great Danes is Scooby-Doo. Buy Great Dane Beds, Best Dog Bed for Great Dane.
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